Roadtrek Roadtrip, Bird Food

It has been interesting, watching the foraging behavior of the birds here. The whistling ducks are mostly vegetarians, eating plants along the water’s edge, in or out of the water. The limpkin goes for the mussels along the shore line – by the dozens! Their bills are specialized for opening bivalves, which they bring up on the grass to eat.

And the anhinga fishes, also by the dozens. They probably have to share with the herons and wood storks – but the wood storks come through at dusk, feeding, when everyone else has retired for the evening.

Roadtrek Roadtrip, More Birds Not Seen in New England

Seeing a pair of pink birds flying across the pond, they were immediately identifiable as roseate spoonbills. They don’t usually hang out here, and I’ve not seen one close enough for a good photo, but we certainly don’t have them in New England!

I met anhingas several years ago. At first I thought they were cormorants, but the coloring is slightly different, and they have a different shape of tail. Also called snake birds locally, they look particularly snake-like when only their neck shows above the water.

Limpkins are common around the pond this year – and they are LOUD!! They often call to their friends across the way, or in the air. Or maybe they aren’t friends, and it’s a warning call – I don’t speak Limpkin! I first saw them a few years ago, kayaking a little south of here. The whistling ducks treat them with respect, giving them space if they come strolling through.

The wood stork has only been coming through here at dusk. It’s a huge bird. I wish I’d not had a large truck tailgating me as I passed a roadside pond in Georgia with a dozen or more wading in it! But it wasn’t safe to stop for a photo. Sigh.

Two herons, a tri-color and a little blue. I also have seen a couple of great blue herons, but only in flight, or at a distance. I did get one photo, but only of the legs trailing behind as it flew by!

White ibis, strolling past.