Roadtrek Roadtrip, More Birds Not Seen in New England

Seeing a pair of pink birds flying across the pond, they were immediately identifiable as roseate spoonbills. They don’t usually hang out here, and I’ve not seen one close enough for a good photo, but we certainly don’t have them in New England!

I met anhingas several years ago. At first I thought they were cormorants, but the coloring is slightly different, and they have a different shape of tail. Also called snake birds locally, they look particularly snake-like when only their neck shows above the water.

Limpkins are common around the pond this year – and they are LOUD!! They often call to their friends across the way, or in the air. Or maybe they aren’t friends, and it’s a warning call – I don’t speak Limpkin! I first saw them a few years ago, kayaking a little south of here. The whistling ducks treat them with respect, giving them space if they come strolling through.

The wood stork has only been coming through here at dusk. It’s a huge bird. I wish I’d not had a large truck tailgating me as I passed a roadside pond in Georgia with a dozen or more wading in it! But it wasn’t safe to stop for a photo. Sigh.

Two herons, a tri-color and a little blue. I also have seen a couple of great blue herons, but only in flight, or at a distance. I did get one photo, but only of the legs trailing behind as it flew by!

White ibis, strolling past.

Kayaking Herricks Cove, Vermont

Thursday, September 3: On my way in the dirt road that leads to Herrick’s Cove, these fawns greeted me. Well, that’s a little strong – they departed briskly when I stopped to take photos!

This cove is nestled in behind where the Williams River joins the Connecticut River. This late in the year, it has lots of water lilies and lily pads, and pickerel weed patches.

Where the highway crossed the Williams River, they are replacing a very high bridge – with lots of cranes to help.

That’s the view up the Williams River; here’s the view south on the Connecticut River.

It’s hard to believe the wind was that still in the late morning! There was wildlife as well – I chose that cove because it often has lots of herons and egrets, but I had to paddle out into the Connecticut to see even one heron.

And then it was back into the cove

where grabbing this root mass made it much easier to exit the kayak!

Kayaking North Hartland Dam, Vermont

Four of us caravanned to North Hartland Dam, in Vermont, a Corps of Engineers facility. Covid has them closing the beach, and their picnic shelters, but the boat ramp is open. It was overcast when we arrived – probably river valley fog – but the sun was out by the time we left. It started out very calm, with lots of reflections.

There was lots of wildlife – eagles, cormorants, turtles, herons –

These birds remained unidentified – even after going through bird books at the library later that day!

We could have spent longer, and gone all the way upstream to Quechee Gorge, but I had an appointment to get the windshield replaced on my Roadtrek. We packed ourselves up and three of us went and found a picnic table up the hill at which to eat lunch. It was a beautiful day to be on the water, and the wildlife was an added bonus!